Tiptoe Through the Tulips with Chiara

Chiara authors the blog On the Dijk and comes to the Netherlands, like so many of us, due to Dutch love. She comes from Italy and has been residing in the Netherlands with her soon-to-be husband for a year-and-a-half. The fact that she was accompanied here by her cat, makes her a proud fellow exPet owner. Chiara loves teaching and is doing her best to reconcile with the many differences between the Netherlands and her home country.

How long have you been living in the Netherlands and what brought you here?
I have been living in the Netherlands for a year and a half, I came here in December 2008. My story is all but original: I came here to live with my partner (soon husband), who is Dutch. After one year of flying back and forth between Leiden and Turin, we thought it would be a little more practical to actually live in the same house, so I packed up my books and the cat and here I am.

Do you plan to stay in the Netherlands, move back to your home country, or try somewhere else?
We don’t really have a long-term plan. For the moment our life is here, and so it seems it will remain for a few years at least. In the long run (really long) we plan to move south and spend our retirement in Italy, but as we’re both in our thirties it might take a while. We don’t rule out moving somewhere else, but we’re not actually planning to leave at the moment.

What do you do during the day (job, stay at home mom, entrepreneur, student, etc)?
I work as a teacher of Italian in different schools and organizations. I left an office job to come here and went back to my first love, teaching – and did not regret it for a minute, so far.

What’s the most notable difference between your home country and the Netherlands?
Ah, differences – there are a lot. What struck me most is, I think, how organized and regulated NL is. Italy is a very chaotic country, and the simple fact of being able to get a document at the town hall in less than an hour still makes me feel as if I lived in Disneyland. This reflects on all aspects of life here. People tend to be less spontaneous and happy-go-lucky than what I’m used to, which can be quite complicated at times, but in general I find it really enjoyable and relaxing.

Where is your favorite place to visit in the Netherlands?
It’s difficult to say, there are a lot of beautiful places. Walking on the dunes in the Kennemerland park, or driving through the countryside are two of my favorite pastimes, but a day in a city like Haarlem is also quite high on my list. Or the Afsluitdijk. Or the Batavia Werf in Lelystad.


Give us one thing you love about the Netherlands and one thing you loathe…
I love the neatness, of places and people. As I said, I love the fact that everything seems to work the way it’s supposed to, at least as far as possible and despite all the complaints from locals.

The same neatness is, however, what I don’t like: coming from a country as unorganized as Italy, it’s easy to feel a bit claustrophobic and constricted in such a neat and regulated place. Also, the Dutch seem to seldom carry handkerchiefs, which makes my train ride decidedly unpleasant in flu season…

What’s one thing you’ve had to adjust to since coming to the Netherlands and how did you adjust (or are you still working on it)?
I am still trying to adjust to the fact that it’s abnormal for people to meet without scheduling it first. To meet a friend for coffee, you have to compare agendas and schedule the start and end time at least two weeks in advance if not more. I love unexpected visits and random calls, and they just don’t seem to happen here.

Do you have an embarrassing moment since you’ve moved that you would like to share with us (an unfortunate language blunder, or a funny getting-back-on-the-bike story)?
I haven’t really had any expat-embarrassing moment since I’m here – I’m quite a careful person and try to avoid potential disasters as much as I can. I’ve had my share of general mishaps though, like spilling coffee all over myself from a faulty paper cup while giving a lesson at University and only noticing when the coffee soaked all three layers I was wearing…


What’s the best piece of advice you received that you would like to pass along to anyone coming to the Netherlands?

Learn Dutch. No, really – most people speak English well, and they won’t mind talking to you in English. If you’re a tourist or just passing through. But if you plan to live here, and hopefully make friends, rule number one is to make an effort to learn the language, at least a bit.

Do you have any blogs or websites that you would like to to recommend?
Expat information for me starts with Expatica – most of what one needs is to be found there. For fun, I regularly read many blogs and sites – my favorites are Invading Holland and Clogs and [Hotdogs]. To know what’s going on, Trippist is worth keeping an eye out for.

Images courtesy of Chiara

Interested in doing an interview of your own? Send me an email at clogsandtulipsblog@gmail.com with ‘Tiptoe Through the Tulips’ in the subject line. I look forward to hearing from you!

The opinions and content within this post are solely those of the guest poster and in no way reflect the views of  the Clogs and Hotdogs blog or its blogger.

This site contains affiliate links. When you buy something using those links, a portion of your purchase goes to helping update and maintain Clogs and Hotdogs. Thank you for your support!

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Tiptoe Through the Tulips with Invader Stu

Stuart is undoubtedly the funniest blogger on the block: his stories are witty and truthful and bound to have you rolling on the floor with laughter and his self-designed graphics are the perfect touch. Originally here from London for an accidental job opportunity, he has since found love and is working on getting used to life in the Netherlands.

How long have you been living in the Netherlands and what brought you here?
I’ve been living in the Netherlands since the summer of 2001. I didn’t have any plans to move to the country at the time. It just sort of happened accidentally. I was living in London and I had been out of college for almost a year. I was still trying to find a job in the design industry but was not having much luck until a very strange and cryptic job advertisement caught my eye in a magazine. It was for a job in the computer games industry and invited applicants to participate in creating new and fantastic worlds. It had no address, no phone number and not much else other than a dot com email address. I applied. I waited for a reply while wondering if the strange cryptic nature of it all could lead to a situation where I woke up in a bath of ice in a basement somewhere having fallen victim to a gang of black market human organ dealers using a games company as a front for their diabolical scheme.

A few days later I received an email which included three surprises. Surprise number one was that in no part of the email did they inquire about the condition of my internal organs. Surprise number two was that they were offering me an interview and surprise number three (which was the biggest) was that they were offering to pay for my flights to the interview location… in the city of Amsterdam… in the Netherlands! Since there had been no address in the advertisement or any indication of its location upon the globe I simply assumed the job was in Britain. However, I did not wanting to turn down a free day trip to another country I went for the interview, not really knowing what to do if I was offered the job… which I was. Nine years later and I’m still living in the Netherlands. Plus I still have both my kidney’s which is a bonus.



Do you plan to stay in the Netherlands, move back to your home country, or try somewhere else?
For the first few years I always planned to move back to London at some point. Every time I came to the end of a project at work I would re-evaluate if it was the time to return back to my home country but it was always an easy decision to stay in the Netherlands.

A few years later my ideas changed and I decided that I would like to try another European country rather than move back to London when the time came. However, every time I revaluated my options again the Netherlands was still an easy choice. I just simply fell more and more in love with the place as time went by.

And I’m very happy I stayed because two years ago I met and fell in love with my Dutch girlfriend. Now I know my future is in the Netherlands.

What do you do during the day (job, stay at home mom, entrepreneur, student, etc)?
I’m still working for the same company that brought me here back in 2001. I’m a multiplayer designer which means I get to design the layouts of levels in the game as well as other gameplay mechanics. I’ve spent a lot of that time working on the Killzone franchise.

What’s the most notable difference between your home country and the Netherlands?
I would have to say the biggest and most noticeable difference for me is how laid back everything is. London and a lot of England can get quite aggressive but the Netherlands feels much more relaxed. Maybe the Netherlands is not perfect (I’ve never had any problems) but you don’t get the level of casual valance that we get back in England. The majority of people here are much more friendly.

Where is your favorite place to visit in the Netherlands?
The Efteling. I love theme parks so when I first discovered Efteling (thanks to my Dutch girlfriend) I was very happy. It’s become a tradition to take my parents there every summer when they visit.

But if you’re asking about cities it would have to be either Amsterdam or Haarlem for different reasons.

Give us one thing you love about the Netherlands and one thing you loathe… 
I love being able to use a bicycle to get around the city (Amsterdam). I would never be able to do that in London. Before I moved to the Netherlands I had not been on a bike since I was 13. Now it is a part of my everyday life. I just miss having some hills to speed down but on the positive side there are no hills for me to struggle up so it all evens out I guess.

I can’t think of anything I loathe. I have my small annoyances but nothing really stands out and they are the kind of small annoyances that I would probably have in any country. So I’ll say the one thing I loathe is my terrible laziness when it comes to Dutch. Nine years in the country and I still have the Dutch ability of a three year old. It does not pose too much of a problem since most people here speak English… Then again the reason my Dutch is maybe not as good as it should be is because most people over here speak English… It’s a vicious cycle.

What’s one thing you’ve had to adjust to since coming to the Netherlands and how did you adjust (or are you still working on it)?
That’s a tough one. I guess I had to do a lot of adjusting and growing up when I moved to the Netherlands mainly because it was my first time living by myself. Up until the moment I stepped foot on the plane I had been living with my parents. I made a few mistakes at first. I gave myself food poisoning in the first week and flooded my apartment with the washing machine. Luckily I am much more domestic now.

Do you have an embarrassing moment since you’ve moved that you would like to share with us (an unfortunate language blunder, or a funny getting-back-on-the-bike story)?
I am famous amongst my friends for finding myself in embarrassing moments. There are too many to name.

There was the time I had to go to the police station at 2am to ask for a plaster because I had sliced my finger open while making a late night sandwich and had none in the house (Full Story).

Then there was the time I accidently accused a tourist of being a prostitute when she was only trying to ask for directions to the red light district (Full Story).

Then there was the time I accidently said I had ‘done’ one of my girlfriend’s friends because I got the words ‘het’ and ‘ik’ mixed up (Full Story).

Then there was the time a woman ran up to me in the street wearing a fake rubber penis while being followed by a film crew (Full Story).

Then there is the time I was out jogging and got stopped by the police because I looked suspicious and someone had just broken into a nearby car (Full Story).

And I’m famous in the office where I work for once spending four hours trapped in the office elevator when everyone had gone home for the night (Full Story).

So yes… just a few embarrassing moments.

What’s the best piece of advice you received that you would like to pass along to anyone coming to the Netherlands?
Don’t be afraid to ask for help and don’t be afraid if things do not go well at first. I almost gave up on living in Holland after a few weeks because I was feeling terribly home sick. If it had not been for the advice of a very good friend of mine I might well have gone home and never come back again. He said to me, “Don’t be an idiot. You can come back anytime you want. Give it a few weeks before you make a stupid decision.” I’m very happy he said that.

Do you have any blogs or websites that you would like to recommend?
I follow a lot of expat blogs (including this one): A Touch of Dutch, A Flamingo in Utrecht, Luxor, CanaDutch and some none expat ones Ladybird & Butterfly, Wendi Aarons, Little Red Boat and many others.

Images courtesy of Invader Stu

Interested in doing an interview of your own? Send me an email at clogsandtulipsblog@gmail.com with ‘Tiptoe Through the Tulips’ in the subject line. I look forward to hearing from you!

The opinions and content within this post are solely those of the guest poster and in no way reflect the views of  the Clogs and Hotdogs blog or its blogger.

This site contains affiliate links. When you buy something using those links, a portion of your purchase goes to helping update and maintain Clogs and Hotdogs. Thank you for your support!

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Tiptoe Through the Tulips with Jennifer

Jennifer is yet another IWCU member as well as a fellow American living in the Netherlands. Different from past interviewees, Jennifer and her husband moved here for the sole purpose of giving life abroad a go! Jennifer doesn’t have a website, but can be reached via email at bb5210.jennifer@gmail.com.

How long have you been living in the Netherlands and what brought you here?
I have been living here a little over 2 years, and came here because my husband and I wanted to try living abroad in Europe. My husband introduced me to the Netherlands (early-dating travels) so we decided to seize a job offer presented to my husband. My joke (overused) is that we came here for the kaas natuurlijk!

Do you plan to stay in the Netherlands, move back to your home country, or try somewhere else?
We have had a real struggle with deciding whether to stay or return to our home country. At this point, we are here for now but it changes like the wind despite trying to convince ourselves to stick with a decision. It has been by far the biggest challenge for our relationship.


What do you do during the day (job, stay at home mom, entrepreneur, student, etc)?
I work part-time, otherwise I am home with my daughter on my ouderschapverlof days. I was able to find a job with an international company that allowed me to stay in my general field but did not require Dutch fluency.


What’s the most notable difference between your home country and the Netherlands?
Better use of tax payer money – you truly see the worth of what your money goes towards.

Where is your favorite place to visit in the Netherlands?
Ahh, this will sound silly as I live there, but I would have to say Utrecht – I really love the cities a bit more than the country or sea-side towns.

Give us one thing you love about the Netherlands and one thing you loathe…
Love the bikes/bike system; hate the lack of customer service.

What’s one thing you’ve had to adjust to since coming to the Netherlands and how did you adjust (or are you still working on it)?
I guess the language is the biggest ‘adjustment’ – but I don’t think that is the question. So, I guess the eating habits/food. I think I have definitely succumbed to the Dutch diet in many ways, and continue to grow ‘soft’ on certain things. But I am not sure I would ever want to give up some of my habits/choices that I grew up with. For example, I eat my pannenkoeken for breakfast, not dinner! And don’t get me started on the fillings…


Do you have an embarrassing moment since you’ve moved that you would like to share with us (an unfortunate language blunder, or a funny getting-back-on-the-bike story)?
Not particularly – I make language mistakes all the time. I guess something embarrassing is that some Dutch names are so obscure to me I assign a gender to them which is often the opposite of the truth. For example, I thought Joke was a guy’s name and told the HR person I was so surprised that she was a woman! She wasn’t as amused…

What’s the best piece of advice you received that you would like to pass along to anyone coming to the Netherlands?
Have fun, and the language will come. Also, it is not assimilation that is necessary… but acculturation. In this way, you don’t feel you need to give up yourself, but instead embrace and learn more about a culture.

 
Do you have any blogs or websites that you would like to recommend?
I like http://www.weeronline.nl (very handy in this country!). I work in nutrition, and have found voedingscentrum.nl to be handy and there is a fair amount of info in English.
 

 

Images courtesy of Jennifer

Interested in doing an interview of your own? Send me an email at clogsandtulipsblog@gmail.com with ‘Tiptoe Through the Tulips’ in the subject line. I look forward to hearing from you!

The opinions and content within this post are solely those of the guest poster and in no way reflect the views of  the Clogs and Hotdogs blog or its blogger.

This site contains affiliate links. When you buy something using those links, a portion of your purchase goes to helping update and maintain Clogs and Hotdogs. Thank you for your support!

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Tiptoe Through the Tulips with Luana McLaren

Another newbie to expat life in the Netherlands, Luana is here all the way from Australia. They’re keeping their options open once her husband’s two-year contract is up: back to France, staying on in the Netherlands, or perhaps giving San Francisco a go. For now, though, she’s quite happy to be in the Netherlands. Now, if only the weather were a bit more agreeable! A knitter, a traveler, a Dutch student, and a blogger, you can read more about her adventures on her blog.

How long have you been living in the Netherlands and what brought you here?
I’ve only been living in the Netherlands for a little over two months but I’m thoroughly enjoying it so far. I love new adventures and after spending six months living in the south of France in 2007-2008, my husband and I decided we’d like to move overseas again after he finished his studies. I’m half Dutch (my father was born here, but lives in Australia) and have always had an interest in the culture. When my husband was offered a post-doc position in the Netherlands earlier this year, it seemed like the perfect opportunity for us to set off on a new exciting adventure while getting in touch with my roots.

Do you plan to stay in the Netherlands, move back to your home country, or try somewhere else?
At the moment, I have no concrete plans. My husband and I moved here on a two year contract but if we are still enjoying living here at the end of this time and there is work available, I see no reason why we wouldn’t stay for longer. I’d love to move back to France at some point in the future and we’ve both always wanted to try living in San Francisco, so who knows where we might end up! The hardest thing about staying here though is the distance from family and friends. Australia isn’t just a quick flight away – it’s a long (24 hour +), expensive trip to go home. So basically, we’re just taking life as it comes and enjoying the moment!

What do you do during the day (job, stay at home mom, entrepreneur, student, etc)?
I’m currently studying an intensive beginners Dutch language course through the local university. The classes are run over three half days per week, however with the amount of huiswerk and self study required, I’m finding that this is taking up a lot of my time. I’m still undecided about whether or not I will take the next level; I’m trying to get enough of a grasp of the language to be able to find a job. I’m really enjoying studying & the change in lifestyle – I have time to savour the small things in life, and do things I love such as cooking, baking, knitting, sewing and of course – riding my bike everywhere! I really love making ‘softies’ (handmade children’s toys) and had just started selling these before leaving Australia so I am hoping to get back into this before long.


What’s the most notable difference between your home country and the Netherlands?
The most notable difference would have to be the size of the country. I’ve heard Dutch people complain about how Holland is too small, too cramped etc, but to me – it’s wonderful! As people keep reminding me, Australia is a HUGe country. To get anywhere, you’ve either got to fly or drive great distances. Here, you can drive from north to south in a matter of hours instead of weeks! It makes most places easily accessible in a dar trip which I think is fantastic. And despite the size of the country, the scenery is quite varied, even if it’s rather flat!

Where is your favorite place to visit in the Netherlands?
I can’t say I have a favourite place, just yet. There are still so many more places that I want to explore before choosing a favourite! Although I’m slightly biased, I do really love Nijmegen and the surrounding area. I love that I can live in a beautiful city where there is decent shopping, restaurants, cinemas and things to do and yet is still so close to the countryside.

Give us one thing you love about the Netherlands and one thing you loathe…
I love… I love so many things about this country already! The first thing would have to be the people. On the whole, I’ve found Dutch people to be incredibly friendly, helpful, genuine, thoughtful and very welcoming. I could think of so many instances where the Dutch hospitality has really blown me away, even in the short time we’ve been here!

I also really love the preferred mode of transport. Bikes are such a fantastic way to get around town, the country is so well set up for cyclists and I love how it’s the norm to ride your bike everywhere. It’s good for you, it’s fun and it’s not impacting the environment: I LOVE it!

However, I loathe the weather. I’m slowly getting used to it and it’s bearable, but after coming from Queensland, Australia where the winters are very mild and there is an abundance of sunshine, I’m finding it quite a shock to still be rugged up in coats and scarves during spring! I’m not a huge fan of the rain and number of overcast days, but the glorious sunny days well and truly make up for it. I love how the town really comes alive when the sun is out – it seems like more people are out on their bikes or enjoying a beer on a sunny terrasje. Sunny days here are just SO beautiful!

What’s one thing you’ve had to adjust to since coming to the Netherlands and how did you adjust (or are you still working on it)?
I’ve really had to adjust to the differences in the supermarket. Although Australia doesn’t have large hypermarkets like in the USA, supermarkets here are still considerably smaller, even when visiting the ‘XL’ versions. I often find myself having to visit a number of supermarkets before I can find simple items. That being said, I really enjoy browsing through supermarkets in foreign countries and the array of food here that’s not available in Australia makes up for the things I miss!!! I’m also still adjusting to having to pack my own groceries at the checkout. I regularly find myself in line at the supermarket without a plastic bag handy and just stand there blankly, waiting for the checkout operator to pack my groceries for me!


Do you have an embarrassing moment since you’ve moved that you would like to share with us (an unfortunate language blunder, or a funny getting-back-on-the-bike story)?
Oh, there’s been a few embarrassing moments 🙂 Once I’ve been here for a bit longer and my red face begins to subside, I might find them a bit funnier 🙂 But for now, I try and share anything I’m not too embarrassed to admit on my blog http://la-petite-lulu.blogspot.com

What’s the best piece of advice you received that you would like to pass along to anyone coming to the Netherlands?
I would advise people to learn the basics of the language before arriving and do your research on the country. I moved here with less then eight weeks notice (compared to eight months notice when moving to France!) and with packing up our house, finishing my job and saying goodbye to friends & family, by the time we hopped on the plane to leave Australia I realised that I really had no clue about the Netherlands and arrived here with a vocabularly consisting only of a poorly pronounced Goedemorgen! Although people here do speak English, I think you get a much richer experience when you are able to speak at least the basics of the language. This is why I’m studying a language course even though it’s not required for my visa. I would also suggest doing your research on the country – finding out what is expected of you when you arrive in terms of necessary insurances, opening a bank account, renting a property, buying a car and so on: the basic things that you need to do shortly after arrival.

Do you have any blogs or websites that you would like to recommend?
Since arriving, I’ve found a lot of valuable information on http://www.expatica.com/nl/ . There are a number of blogs about life in Holland that I also enjoy reading on a daily basis, these include http://atouchofdutch.blogspot.com/ and of course the first expat blog I started reading, http://clogsandtulips.blogspot.com 🙂

Images courtesy of Luana McLaren

Interested in doing an interview of your own? Send me an email at clogsandtulipsblog@gmail.com with ‘Tiptoe Through the Tulips’ in the subject line. I look forward to hearing from you!

The opinions and content within this post are solely those of the guest poster and in no way reflect the views of  the Clogs and Hotdogs blog or its blogger.

This site contains affiliate links. When you buy something using those links, a portion of your purchase goes to helping update and maintain Clogs and Hotdogs. Thank you for your support!

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Tiptoe Through the Tulips with Amy

Meet Amy: an American who came to the Netherlands 2 years ago as a highly skilled migrant. By day, she’s a technical writer for a software company. By night (read: when not working) she’s hanging out at her favorite locale the Hoge Veluwe National Park in Gelderland. You can learn even more about her by reading her blog amy in .nl.

How long have you been living in the Netherlands and what brought you here?
I’ve lived in the Netherlands for two years. I came here from the U.S. as a highly skilled migrant (kennismigrant). The kennismigrant program allows Dutch companies to hire non-EU citizens who are uniquely qualified for particular jobs.

Do you plan to stay in the Netherlands, move back to your home country, or try somewhere else?
I plan to stay in the Netherlands for a while. I haven’t explored nearly enough of the country, not to mention the rest of Europe. I’m open to trying another country in the future, but legal emigration can be hard for an American citizen. I’m fortunate that the kennismigrant program enables me to live and work in the Netherlands.

What do you do during the day (job, stay at home mom, entrepreneur, student, etc)?
I’m a technical writer for a software company.

What’s the most notable difference between your home country and the Netherlands?
The political spectrum in the Netherlands is quite different. Generally, conservative Dutch politicians are more liberal than American Republicans (with the possible exception of the ChristenUnie party). The Dutch political party system is also more flexible than the American two-party system. For example, here you can vote for a party that is fiscally conservative but socially liberal, while in the States, such distinctions are usually lost.


Where is your favorite place to visit in the Netherlands?
I recently fell in love with the Hoge Veluwe National Park in Gelderland. The whole Veluwe area is beautiful for bike riding (although it’s not as flat as most other places). Also, the park is home to the Kröller-Müller Museum, an excellent art museum with a huge sculpture garden.

Give us one thing you love about the Netherlands and one thing you loathe…
I love the Dutch art and design, from the early Netherlandish painters to Tord Boontje and Droog. I loathe the weather.

What’s one thing you’ve had to adjust to since coming to the Netherlands and how did you adjust (or are you still working on it)?
In the Netherlands, I rely on public transportation, my bike, and my feet to get around. In the States, I lived in a very car-oriented city and drove everywhere. Fortunately, it hasn’t been hard for me to adjust. As much as we commuters like to complain about late trains and overcrowded metros, Dutch public transportation is very good. I rarely feel limited in what I can do without a car. 

Do you have an embarrassing moment since you’ve moved that you would like to share with us (an unfortunate language blunder, or a funny getting-back-on-the-bike story)?
I can’t think of a particular embarrassing moment! I have had my share of uncomfortable encounters, but so far I’ve managed to avoid offending anyone with my terrible Dutch or falling off my bike in front of anyone besides my boyfriend (who, of course, is not allowed to laugh at me).


What’s the best piece of advice you received that you would like to pass along to anyone coming to the Netherlands?
Do lots of research before you decide where to live. There are many factors to consider: housing prices, amenities (like secure bike storage!), noise, traffic (especially if you will be in the Randstad), access to public transportation, access to parks, and the English skills of the people who live and work around you. Housing in the Netherlands can be hard to find, and it’s tempting to grab the first place that is available. But your location will have a huge impact on your expat experience, so it’s important to choose carefully.

Do you have any blogs or websites that you would like to recommend?
I recommend:

  • design.nl, a great resource for current events in Dutch fashion and design
  • utrecht-pics.blogspot.com, daily photos from the beautiful city of Utrecht
  • learndutch.org, free online language lessons
  • taalthuis.com, more free online language lessons
  • omoda.nl, the closest thing to a Dutch zappos.com that I have found!


    Images courtesy of Amy

    Interested in doing an interview of your own? Send me an email at clogsandtulipsblog@gmail.com with ‘Tiptoe Through the Tulips’ in the subject line. I look forward to hearing from you!

    The opinions and content within this post are solely those of the guest poster and in no way reflect the views of  the Clogs and Hotdogs blog or its blogger.

    This site contains affiliate links. When you buy something using those links, a portion of your purchase goes to helping update and maintain Clogs and Hotdogs. Thank you for your support!

    Small Blog Big Income - Learn More about the eBook